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FAQ


Here you can find the answers to your questions. We aim to make your experience as smooth as possible

6 SALES AND PAYMENTS

- How do sales and payments work?
- When do I see how much I got paid, and when do I get my money?
- How does iTunes (and iTunes Plus) sell my music and/or music videos?
- What do I get paid when my songs, albums, EPs or singles sell from the iTunes store(s) I chose?
- How does Rhapsody sell my music?
- How does Napster sell my music?
- What do I get paid when music sells or streams from Napster?
- How does MusicNet sell my music?
- How does eMusic sell my music?
- What do I need to know about Accounting?
- How do I collect the money my music earned?
- Why is there so little (or no) money in my account?
- Do I get paid when someone downloads or streams a sample of my song or music video?
- How much does it cost and what about invoicing?


How do sales and payments work?

There are three ways your music (and one way your music videos) can earn you money in the stores and services you choose:

1) PERMANENT DOWNLOADS
A Permanent Download means someone bought your music or your music video from a store and downloaded it to their computer, cell phone or some other media device. Each time your music is bought, you get paid. There are currently two ways that you get paid by Permanent download:
•    You get a Fixed Pay Rate every time someone purchases your music or music video for download, where you receive an unchanging, predetermined amount of money each time your music is bought. The Fixed Pay Rate remains the same no matter what the store sells it for. Even if the store sells your music for a hundred dollars or a penny, you still get the Fixed Pay Rate.
•    You get a Subscription Pay Rate every time someone purchases your music (not music videos) for download, where you receive a variable amount of money each time your music is bought. The Subscription Pay Rate is different every pay period, and is typically based on four things:
o    How many songs were downloaded in a set period of time (monthly or every three months),
o    How much money was made by the store in the same time frame,
o    What "expenses" are deducted by the store, and
o    What percentage of the remainder is contractually owed to you.

The offer of a Fixed Permanent Download model is given i.e. by these stores:
•    iTunes (all stores)
•    Napster (also offers Streams, see below)
•    Rhapsody (also offers Streams, see below)
•    MusicNet (all stores; also offers Streams, see below)
An example of a Subscription Pay Rate Permanent Download model:
Unlike Fixed Pay Rate models, Subscription Pay Rates can be confusing. Here's an example using eMusic, which has a Subscription Pay Rate Permanent Download model:
For Example: Say, in the months of January, February, March there were a total of 1,000,000 songs downloaded from eMusic by all customers downloading all songs. Imagine in those same months eMusic took in $750,000 in digital download pre-pay revenue. That makes each individual download worth $0.75.
From this $0.75, eMusic then deducts expenses (credit card processing fees, bandwidth, other expenses). For this example, let's say the expenses come to $0.10 per song. This is subtracted from the $0.75 per song, leaving $0.65.
From this remaining $0.65, 60% goes to you. So in this example, you would make $0.39 per song bought: $0.39 is the Subscription Permanent Download Pay Rate for this store in this period. If you had forty downloads from eMusic in this period, you'd make 40 x $0.39 = $15.60 (U.S.), and as always, Deal With Music takes nothing, 100% of that money goes to you.
Remember, the amount you make will vary from statement to statement and from store to store as the number of songs bought and the amount of money made in each period will not be the same, and some stores may have different deals.
The following stores, i.e., offer a Subscription Permanent Download model:
•    eMusic

2) STREAMS
A Stream is when someone listens to your song (not music video) but does not own it and has not downloaded it. People usually listen to streams as part of a subscription model similar to the Subscription Permanent Downloads (see above), paying a monthly subscription fee for the access. In many ways, it's like your fans joined a service that lets them rent your music. As soon as they stop paying their monthly rental fee, they will not have access to listen to your music. Each time more than thirty seconds of your music is listened to, you get paid a fee called a Streaming Pay Rate
There are typically two ways to listen to music as a stream: "Tethered" and "Non-Tethered" streams:
•    A Tethered Stream means the media player (usually a computer) must be connected (or "tethered") to the Internet at all times in order to listen to the music.
•    A Non-Tethered Stream means the media player (either a computer or, more often, a portable iPod or iPod-like device, like a Creative Zen Vision, Toshiba Gigabeat, and so on) only needs to be connected to the Internet once a month for the service to confirm that the user has paid their monthly subscription fee. After one month, if the person either stops paying their fee OR if the person does not connect their device to the Internet to verify that they have paid, the songs will stop playing on their computer or portable player.
Each time your music streams, you get paid the Streaming Pay Rate for that store. EXCEPTION: Some stores let potential customers stream for promotion or as a "free trial." In those cases, even though your music may stream, you will not get paid.
The following stores/services offer Streaming Pay Rate:
•    Napster
•    Rhapsody
•    MusicNet (all stores)

3) ADVERTISING
There are some new services that allow people to listen to your music (not music videos) for free. In return, the services sell advertising space on the Website where people must go and stay in order to listen to the music. The amount of money you receive each time your music is listened to is predicated on how much money the service made in advertising revenue.
At this time, Deal With Music is not working with any stores or services that pay out money based on advertising revenue.



When do I see how much I got paid, and when do I get my money?

Until the stores and services you chose send information, there is no way of knowing what has sold, where it has sold, how many copies it has sold or how much money you have made from the sale of your music or music videos.
All of the stores and services send out this information in one of two ways:
•    Within 45 days after the end of each month, or
•    Within 45 days after the end of every three months.
For example, iTunes sends information and payment by 45 days after the end of each month, so sales and information for the month of March are sent by iTunes by May 15th (May 15th is 45 days after the end of March). Sales and information on what your music sold in the month of April is sent by iTunes (and all other services that account monthly) by June 15th, and so on.
For example, eMusic sends out all information and money by 45 days after the end of every three months. Sales and information for the months of January, Febuary and March gets sent by eMusic by May 15th, which is 45 days after the end of March. Sales and information for the months of April, May and June gets sent by eMusic by August 15th, which is 45 days after the end of June, and so on.
IMPORTANT: Until the stores and services send the information and payment for the sales, there is no way of knowing what has sold, where it has sold, how many copies sold or anything else. Rest assured, as soon as the information is received, it will be communicated to you or it will appear in your My Details page and your money will be available to take.
Example of STORES/SERVICES that send information and money by 45 days after the end of each month:
•    iTunes U.S.
•    iTunes Canada
•    iTunes Australia
•    iTunes New Zealand
•    iTunes U.K.
•    iTunes European Union
•    iTunes Japan
•    iTunes Video (all territories)
•    Rhapsody
•    MusicNet
•    Napster (digital downloads only).
Example of STORES/SERVICES that send information by 45 days after the end of every three months:
•    eMusic
•    Napster (digital downloads for that month and streams for the full three months).



How does iTunes (and iTunes Plus) sell my music and/or music videos?

There are currently seven iTunes stores:
•    iTunes United States, selling music and music videos only in the U.S.
•    iTunes Canada, selling music and music videos only in Canada
•    iTunes U.K., selling music and music videos only in England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland
•    iTunes Europe, selling music and music videos only in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Ireland (Republic), Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland
•    iTunes Japan, selling music and music videos only in Japan
•    iTunes Australia, selling music and music videos only in Australia
•    iTunes New Zealand, selling music and music videos only in New Zealand.
All iTunes stores sell music and music videos only as permanent digital downloads (no streaming is offered) that the customer owns and uses in the Fixed Pay Rate Permanent Digital Download model. Customers can purchase songs or music videos individually for a per-song/per-video price, or customers can buy albums whole (not music videos), getting every song on that album for one set price. However, this isn't always the case. See below for EXCEPTIONS.
Most often, iTunes sells individual songs at $0.99 each. Most often, albums are sold for either the sum of all the songs on the album (for albums with ten or less songs), or for a single set price of $9.99 for albums over ten songs. See below for EXCEPTIONS.
For example, if your album has five songs, an iTunes U.S. customer can either buy the songs individually for $0.99 or the whole album for 5 x $0.99 = $4.95. If you had another album with 12 songs, an iTunes U.S. customer can either buy the songs individually for $0.99 or the whole album for $9.99.
EXCEPTIONS: iTunes (and all other digital retailers, for that matter) reserves the right to sell music and/or music videos any way they want and at any price they want. When your songs or albums or music videos sell, you will always receive the required amount, but iTunes can sell your music or video for a penny, a million dollars or anything in between. For music, iTunes reserves the right to make a song "purchasable only with the album." That is, no button would be placed next to the song itself, no option to download it on its own would be available to the iTunes customer. iTunes does this solely at their own discretion. Sometimes they do it to long songs (presumably because a 73-minute song would be too much of a bargain for just $0.99, since that's a whole album's worth of music on a single song). Sometimes they do it to very short songs (presumably because $0.99 is too much for a 10-second song). Sometimes they simply adjust the price. However iTunes decides, Deal With Music has no say in the matter, and neither do our patrons. Regardless, once a song or an album or a music video sells, you will be paid the required amount the moment iTunes sends the money. There is no withholding of any sort, not from iTunes, not from Deal With Music.
Remember, only albums, EPs and singles can be set to sell in stores/services, not individual songs. All songs are grouped into albums (technically, an EP and a single is an album of few or one song), and however the album is set to sell, so will all the songs on that album.
What is iTunes Plus, and will my music sell as iTunes Plus?
In the middle of 2007, iTunes launched a new initiative, "iTunes Plus." Music would now be sold in iTunes in two different ways:
iTunes "regular" (it has no official name)
•    Available to all
•    Music encoded at 128 kbps .AAC files (to learn more, click here)
•    Music protected with Digital Rights Management (DRM)
•    Music is NOT available for sale as an iTunes Ring Tone for iPhones
iTunes Plus
•    Available to all
•    Music encoded at 256 kbps .AAC files (to learn more, click here)
•    Music NOT protected with Digital Rights Management (DRM)
•    Music is available for sale as an iTunes Ring Tone for iPhones
Prior to the middle of 2007, all music for sale in iTunes was available only as iTunes "regular."
IMPORTANT: If you had your music delivered by Deal With Music into iTunes prior to the first half of 2007, your music was likely for sale as iTunes "regular" through October 2007, and may still be available only as iTunes "regular," or it may have been converted automatically into iTunes Plus (see below).
iTunes announced it would be converting its entire catalog to iTunes Plus in October, 2007, which they did: all music in all iTunes stores that could be converted into iTunes Plus, were. This may or may not include your music (see below).
IMPORTANT: If you had your music delivered by Deal With Music into iTunes during the latter part of 2007, your music is likely for sale as iTunes Plus. ALL MUSIC currently delivered into iTunes through Deal With Music is AUTOMATICALLY for sale as iTunes Plus. If you do not want your music as iTunes Plus, please contact Deal With Music's Customer Support at info@dealwithmusic.com before you pay to have your album delivered to iTunes.
How do I know if my music in iTunes is for sale as iTunes Plus?
iTunes did not begin putting music into iTunes Plus on a specific day or at some specific time. Thus, it's difficult for us to tell you directly if your music is for sale as iTunes Plus if you used Deal With Music prior to mid-2007. Furthermore, Deal With Music delivers high quality music to iTunes and all the stores we service, but some of the files we delivered to iTunes prior to mid-2007 were of insufficient bit rate to be converted to iTunes Plus in October 2007, and so may still exist as iTunes "regular" files.
Please keep in mind:
•    If your music was delivered by Deal With Music in October or November, 2007, it's very likely to be in iTunes Plus.
•    All music delivered by Deal With Music from December, 2007, is iTunes Plus.
•    Even if your music was delivered earlier, it may have been converted to iTunes Plus in October, 2007.
To check if your music is for sale in iTunes as iTunes Plus:
•    STEP ONE: Download and install the iTunes Player from www.itunes.com, if you don't already have it.
•    STEP TWO: Search for your music in the iTunes store you had Deal With Music deliver it to (you only need to find it in one store for this test: if a song is iTunes Plus for one store, it is iTunes Plus for all).
•    STEP THREE: Examine any of the songs from any of your albums: if there is a "plus" icon in the price column, that song is for sale as iTunes Plus.
•    OPTIONAL: Examine the column headed by an icon of a bell: if there is a bell icon in the song's row, that song is for sale as iTunes Plus (the bell icon indicates it's for sale as a Ring Tone for iPhones, which is only available for iTunes Plus songs).
If you discover your music is for sale as iTunes "regular" and you wish it to be available in iTunes Plus or vice versa, please contact Deal With Music's Customer Support at info@dealwithmusic.com immediately.
IMPORTANT: If a customer acquired your album, EP or single as a "regular" iTunes purchase in the past and the same album, EP or single is offered in iTunes Plus, they can UPGRADE their purchase for a small fee. You will see part of that fee as a royalty payment when the accounting for that month is reported. The price for an album "upgraded" will be about $2.00 (U.S. dollars), depending on the number of tracks on the album upgraded.



What do I get paid when my songs, albums, EPs or singles sell from the iTunes store(s) I chose?
When an individual song or album/EP/single or music video sells from an iTunes store, you get a fixed "pay rate," the same pay rate for all independent record labels. (for information about the Fixed Pay Rate for music Permanent Download model, check the relative question).
Remember, only iTunes can set the sale price, but no matter what they sell that song or album/EP/single or music video for, you always get the current pay rate. Even if iTunes wants to have a discount, say, offering its customers your content for a penny each, you still get the full pay rate every time it sells.
Albums, EPs, singles and individual songs sell differently, so the pay rate is different:
How much is the pay rate for music?
Deal With Music takes none of the money from the sale of your music. You get it all (unless you have chosen the Split Deal Account). For the iTunes U.S. store, you receive $0.70 per song sold individually and $7.00 per album with 11 or more songs sold in its entirety.
You are paid the pay rate in the local currency of the country where the sale occurred. For example, if an album or song sells from the iTunes Japan store, iTunes Japan pays in Japanese yen (¥). The money is converted into U.S. dollars by the bank and forwarded on to you. As always, Deal With Music takes none of the money from the sale of your music (unless you have chosen the Split Deal Account).
Be aware that bank conversion rates are out of our control and can change from day to day. The bank will convert the currency into U.S. dollars based on what the exchange rate is at the time the bank receives the money.
For songs sold individually off an EP or album through the iTunes stores, you receive the following:
iTunes Stores Worldwide:    You receive
iTunes U.S. Store    US$0.70 (no exchange required)
iTunes Australia Store    Australian Dollars AU$0.99 (EXCEPTION BELOW!)
iTunes New Zealand Store    New Zealand Dollars NZ$1.17 (EXCEPTION BELOW!)
iTunes Canada Store    Canadian Dollars CAD$0.78
iTunes Japan Store    Japanese Yen ¥100 (EXCEPTION BELOW!)
iTunes U.K. Store    British Pounds £0.49
iTunes Europe Store    Euros €0.71 (after September, 2007)
Albums and EPs are sold in their entirety in two possible ways:
•    Albums under 11 songs and EPs are priced by the song. To calculate how much you would receive from the sale of an album with less than 11 songs or an EP, multiply the number of songs by the pay rate of that iTunes store.
•    Albums with 11 songs or more sold in their entirety have a set pay rate listed below.
For albums with 11 or more songs sold in their entirety, you receive the following:
iTunes Stores Worldwide    You receive
iTunes U.S. Store    US$7.00 (no exchange required)
iTunes Australia Store    Australian Dollars AU$9.99 (EXCEPTION BELOW!)
iTunes New Zealand Store    New Zealand Dollars NZ$11.75 (EXCEPTION BELOW!)
iTunes Canada Store    Canadian Dollars CAD$7.80
iTunes Japan Store    Japanese Yen ¥1000 (EXCEPTION BELOW!)
iTunes UK Store    British Pounds £4.90
iTunes Europe Store    Euros €7.10 (after September, 2007)

IMPORTANT: Special iTunes Pricing and Pay Rates:
How much is the pay rate for "complete my album" purchases?
iTunes lets customers who purchased some of the tracks off one of your albums to, on some future date, "Complete My Album" (CMA) and get the rest of the album for only the cost of the remaining tracks.
For accounting purposes, CMA purchases do not appear: rather, the album counts as a full sale, and the previously purchased track is considered refunded.
EXAMPLE: If you had an album in iTunes U.S. with 15 songs/tracks and one of your fans purchased a song from it (say, track #8) you'd get the track Pay Rate of $0.70. If later the same customer came back and purchased the album in its entirety as a CMA, you would earn the Pay Rate for a whole album sale for albums over 11 songs/tracks, $7.00; a refund for the original track #8 purchase would be generated, but not appear in your accounting: it would "cancel out" the next sale you had of that particular track. That is, if in the same month, someone (anyone) purchased track #8, that sale would be "cancelled out" by the CMA refund and not appear. The refund remains until cancelled out by a sale, and can persist over many months until another track #8 is purchased.
NOTE: None of this has anything to do with the Trending Reports, which do not take into consideration the royalties. This is just one of many ways the Trending Reports are different from the Royalty Reports, and should not be compared side-by-side.
How much is the pay rate for "upgraded" album purchases?
If a customer acquired your album, EP or single as a "regular" iTunes purchase in the past and the same album, EP or single is offered in iTunes Plus, they can UPGRADE their purchase for a small fee. You will see part of that fee as a royalty payment when the accounting for that month is reported. The price for an album "upgraded" will be about $2.00 (U.S. dollars), depending on the number of tracks on the album upgraded.


How does Rhapsody sell my music?

Real Networks has a digital music service called Rhapsody which lets customers buy permanent digital downloads as well as stream digital music directly from their site to a computer and, if customers choose to use Rhapsody's "To Go" program, on selected portable devices. For help with the Rhapsody service, we suggest you use Rhapsody Support. Rhapsody has several ways of allowing its customers to buy or listen to music:
•    RealPlayer Music Store (http://musicstore.real.com) sells music only as permanent digital downloads that the customer owns and uses. Visit our section on Fixed Pay Rate Permanent Download models to learn more.
•    Rhapsody streaming subscription service lets Rhapsody Subscribers listen to music as much as they want as streams (not downloads) for a single flat subscription fee. However, if that subscription lapses, the music becomes inaccessible to the customer. Visit our section on Subscription Streaming models to learn more.
There are several kinds of Rhapsody customers each with their own options for buying your music, each of which generates money for you in a different way:
•    Rhapsody Subscribers can listen to an unlimited number of full-length songs while they are connected to the Internet and download an unlimited number of high quality music files to their PC. They can listen to these downloaded songs online or offline and keep the music they download so long as their subscription is current. These songs and albums aren't "purchased" or "permanent" downloads, there's no way for a customer to burn or save the music, and as soon as the customer's subscription lapses, they lose access to these "tethered downloads."
•    Rhapsody Subscribers can also buy permanent downloads (at a lower price than non-subscribers pay, currently a 10% discount per track).
•    Rhapsody Non-Subscribing Customers (any person who goes to the website) can stream 25 songs each month before they are asked to put down a credit card to continue either as a Trial Subscriber or a Subscriber.
•    Rhapsody Non-Subscribing Customers can also buy permanent downloads, but they pay more than subscribers.
•    Rhapsody Trial Subscribers are trying out the Rhapsody subscription streaming service. Trial Subscriptions last 14 days. Trial subscribers have put down a credit card and typically get access for free for 14 days before being charged for the first month of subscription (see below for important details).
•    Rhapsody Trial Subscribers can also buy permanent downloads at the market rate of $0.99 per track.
What do I get paid when my music sells or stream from Rhapsody?
Each time a Rhapsody Non-Subscribing Customer permanently downloads your music, you get a payment. When a Rhapsody Subscriber or Rhapsody Trial Subscriber permanently downloads, you also get a payment, but a fraction less. When a Rhapsody Subscriber streams or "tethered downloads" your songs, you get a payment, but when a Rhapsody Trial Subscriber streams, you don't get a payment (see below). Non-Subscribers can stream only up to 25 whole songs per month before they put down a credit card and opt in either to become Trail Subscribers or Subscribers, but if they stream one of your songs during this "Rhapsody 25," you will receive payment.
IMPORTANT: Anyone in the United States can sign up for a Rhapsody Trial by putting down a credit card and get unlimited free streams for 14 days. If a customer streams your music during this period, you will not get any payment for the streams--it's considered promotional. This is a Rhapsody policy. If you do not like the idea of people streaming your music for free, please do not choose Rhapsody as one of your digital distribution stores.
Albums and EPs are sold in two possible ways:
•    Albums under 11 songs and EPs are priced by the song. To calculate how much you would receive from the sale of an album with less than 11 songs, multiply the number of songs by the pay rate for that kind of Rhapsody customer.
•    Albums with 11 songs or more sold in their entirety have a set pay rate.
How will be able to see the exact pay rate Deal With Music pays you for each song or album/EP/single every time it's downloaded or streamed from Rhapsody in your Deal With Music accounting report. The pay rate is available as an element in every line item. As always, this is all the money owed to you for that stream or download, NOTHING was taken by Deal With Music.



How does Napster sell my music?

Napster lets customers listen to an unlimited number of full-length songs while they are connected to the Internet and download an unlimited number of high quality music files to their PC. They can listen to these downloaded songs online or offline and keep the music they download for as long as they want to be a "Member."
Napster subscribers can access music in two ways: as "Members" and "To Go Members." Although Napster sometimes differentiates between the Napster store and the Napster Light store, these contain the same music, and your albums will be in both. For a complete description of the Napster service, we suggest you read the Napster FAQ. NOTE: Deal With Music is aware of the Napster Ringtones service, and we are currently working on how to make this available for our customers.
•    Napster Permanent Download Store sells music only as permanent digital downloads that the customer owns and uses. These files are 256 kbps .MP3 files, and are the customer's to keep forever, even if they are not (or cease to be) a Napster "member." Visit our section on Fixed Pay Rate Permanent Download models to learn more.
•    Napster Streaming Service lets Napster Subscribers listen to music as much as they want as streams (not downloads) for a single flat subscription fee. However, when that subscription lapses, the music becomes inaccessible to the customer. Visit our section on Subscription Streaming models.



What do I get paid when music sells or streams from Napster?

Remember that no matter how an individual song or album sells from Napster, you get a fixed "pay rate", the same pay rate for all independent record labels. Only Napster can set the sale price, but no matter what they sell that song or album for, you always get the current pay rate. Even if Napster wants to have a discount, say, offering its customers your songs for a penny each, you still get the full pay rate every time one of your songs or albums sell. Visit our section on Subscription Streaming models to learn more.
Napster works in several ways:
•    Napster Subscribers ("Members" and "To Go Members") have a variety of services available to them. For details, please click here
•    Napster Subscribers ("Members" and "To Go Members") can also buy permanent downloads, by using the Napster Light store, if they wish.
•    Napster Light Customers also have services available. For details, please click here
•    Napster Trial Subscribers ("Trial Members") are trying out the Napster subscription streaming service, and can also buy permanent downloads through the Napster Light store, if they wish.
Each time a Napster Subscriber ("Member" or "To Go Member") streams more than 30 seconds of your song, you get paid. When anyone, even a Napster Subscriber ("Member" or "To Go Member") permanently downloads one of your songs or albums, you also get paid. Here is a chart that tells you what you will you get when a song streams or downloads from the countries Napster sells in:
For Permanent Downloads PER SONG through the Napster Light Store:
Napster Light Worldwide:    You receive per song
Napster U.S. Store    US$0.65
Napster Canada Store    Canadian Dollars CAD$0.65
Napster U.K. Store    British Pounds £0.48
Napster Europe Store    Euros €0.65
Albums and EPs are sold in two possible ways:
•    Albums under 11 songs and EPs are priced by the song. To calculate how much you would receive from the sale of an album with less than 11 songs, multiply the number of songs by the pay rate of that country. For example, from the sale in the U.S. Napster Light Store of a 5-song album, you would receive $3.25 for the whole album.
•    Albums with 11 songs or more sold in their entirety have a set pay rate listed below.
For Permanent Downloads PER ALBUM (11 songs or more) through the Napster Light Store:
Napster Light Worldwide:    You receive per album
Napster U.S. Store    US$6.50
Napster Canada Store    Canadian Dollars CAD$6.50
Napster U.K. Store    British Pounds £4.80
Napster Europe Store    Euros €6.50
For each of your songs streamed by a Napster Subscriber ("Member" or "To Go Member"), you receive a proportionate share of the membership fees, based on the number of streams of your music in that pay period, minus any applicable expenses. As always, Deal With Music keeps NONE of this money.
ImPORTANT: Napster currently distributes in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and the European Union. Napster may add more countries at any time. For the moment, you MUST have worldwide rights to your music before you select to have it available in Napster. In the near future, Deal With Music will offer you the ability to control what parts of the world you make your music available in.



How does MusicNet sell my music?

IMPORTANT: As of Tuesday, July 24, 2007, MusicNet (currently renaming itself to "MediaNet") may no longer accepts submissions.
Although Deal With Music has successfully delivered music to MusicNet and its partner stores for many months, MusicNet has informed us that it may no longer accepting any submissions. Deal With Music is continuing its partnership with MusicNet in the hopes that in the future we can begin redelivery. IMPORTANT: If you have albums already for sale in the stores MusicNet delivers to, those albums will remain available for sale. If your music was slated for delivery to MusicNet but has not yet been accepted by them, they will be unable to process your request. Deal With Music is working with MusicNet to compile a list of those affected; if your album(s) was affected, your account will receive a complete refund for the store. Deal With Music will pro-actively contact you and add $0.99 to your account balance for each album MusicNet was unable to process. Thank you for understanding.
MusicNet provides branded digital music stores for other companies. At the moment, MusicNet's comprehensive suite of digital music services include Yahoo!, Cdigix Ctrax (on more than 30 college campuses), iMesh, HMV Digital, Virgin Digital U.K., FYE Download Zone, MTV's Urge, Microsoft's Zune and MusicGremlin. MusicNet is the world's leading business-to-business digital music service provider.
When you selected to have your albums delivered to MusicNet, your music was be placed in all the stores/services MusicNet currently provides and any future ones they may add. IMPORTANT: There is no way to pick and choose which stores you want to be in at MusicNet--it is an "all or nothing" choice. If you choose to have your music delivered to MusicNet, be aware they may drop or add stores/services, and your music will be removed from any dropped stores/services and/or into any new stores/services. IMPORTANT: Some current or some future stores that are part of MusicNet may distribute in countries outside the United States. You currently MUST have worldwide rights to your music before you select to have it available in the MusicNet group of stores. In the near future, Deal With Music will offer you the ability to control what parts of the world you make your music available in.
MusicNet sells music in various ways:
•    MusicNet Subscribers ("Members") can stream all the music they want for as long as they want as many times as they want for as long as they are subscribers. They can also buy permanent downloads, if they wish.
•    MusicNet Customers can buy permanent downloads, if they wish, without subscribing to any membership. They cannot stream songs on demand, like subscribers can.
•    MusicNet Trial Subscribers ("Trial Members") are trying out the MusicNet subscription streaming service, and will be able to stream as many songs as they want as many times as they want for 30 days at no charge; after the thirty days, they will have to pay to subscribe to keep on-demand streaming. NOTE: They can also buy permanent downloads, if they wish. YOU ARE NOT PAID FOR ANY SONGS STREAMED IN A TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION.
IMPORTANT: Anyone can sign up for MusicNet and get unlimited free streams for 30 days. If a customer streams your music during this period, you will not get any payment for them--it's considered promotional. This is a MusicNet policy. If you do not like the idea of people streaming your music for free, please do not choose MusicNet as one of your digital distribution stores.
What do I get paid when songs STREAM from MusicNet?
For STREAMS, MusicNet works on a Subscription Pay Rate Permanent Download model. MusicNet does not pay a pre-set amount for each stream. For each three month period, MusicNet calculates how many songs were streamed and how much money was paid to MusicNet for subscriptions in that period. This rate changes from period to period based on how many songs are streamed and how much money was paid to MusicNet for subscriptions.
To get the per-song Pay Rate, MusicNet divides the amount of money made by the number of songs streamed. This sets the Pay Rate for each song streamed. From this Pay Rate, MusicNet then deducts out Allowed Expenses (these are not negotiable and are the same Allowed Expenses deducted from all other labels and artists working with MusicNet). As always, Deal With Music takes nothing, passing all of your money on to you. You get 45% of what remains.
For Example: Say, in the months of January, February, March there were a total of 1,000,000 songs streamed from MusicNet by all customers streaming all songs. Imagine in those same months MusicNet took in $250,000 in digital streaming pre-pay revenue. That makes each individual stream worth $0.25.
From this $0.25, MusicNet then deducts expenses (credit card processing fees, advertising, bandwidth, other expenses). For this example, let's say the expenses come to $0.05 per song. This is subtracted from the $0.25 per song, leaving $0.20.
From this remaining $0.20, 45% goes to you. So in this example, you would make $0.09 per song streamed: $0.09 is the Subscription Streaming Pay Rate for this store in this period. If you had forty streams from MusicNet in this period, you'd make 40 x $0.09 = $3.60 (U.S.), and as always, Deal With Music takes nothing, 100% of that money goes to you.
What do I get paid when songs ARE DOWNLOADED from MusicNet?
For DOWNLOADS from MusicNet, regardless of whether or not the customer is a "Member," you get a fixed "pay rate," the same pay rate for all independent record labels. (Click for more information about the Fixed Pay Rate Permanent Download model). Remember, only MusicNet can set the sale price, but no matter what they sell that song or album for, you always get the current pay rate. Even if they want to have a discount, say, offering its customers your songs for a penny each, you still get the full pay rate every time one of your songs or albums sell.
How much is the pay rate?
Deal With Music takes none of the money from the sale of your music. You get it all. Music can be downloaded from MusicNet in several possible ways:
•    Songs downloaded individually generate the song pay rate for that country (see below)
•    Albums under 11 songs and EPs are priced by the song. To calculate how much you would receive from the sale of an album with less than 11 songs or an EP, multiply the number of songs on the album by the song pay rate for that country (see below)
•    For albums with 11 or more sold in their entirety, you receive the album pay rate for that country (see below).
Song Pay Rates, By Country:
MusicNet Downloads Worldwide:    You receive per song
MusicNet U.S. Store    US$0.70
MusicNet Canada Store    Canadian Dollars CAD$0.72
MusicNet U.K. Store    British Pounds £0.47
MusicNet Europe Store    Euros €0.68
Album Pay Rates for Albums Sold In Their Entirety, By Country:
MusicNet Whole-Album Downloads Worldwide:    You receive
MusicNet U.S. Store    US$7.00
MusicNet Canada Store    Canadian Dollars CAD$7.20
MusicNet U.K. Store    British Pounds £4.60
MusicNet Europe Store    Euros €6.70



How does eMusic sell my music?

eMusic is a service that lets people download music (no streaming is offered) on a pre-buy model. eMusic's customers sign up at one of three different pre-buy rates which sets how many songs they can download each month. eMusic currently offers:
•    eMusic Free Trial Period: 25 free downloads
•    eMusic Basic: 30 songs per month for $9.99, which comes to $0.33 a song
•    eMusic Plus: 50 songs per month for $14.99, which comes to $0.30 a song
•    eMusic Premium: 75 songs per month for $19.99, which comes to $0.27 a song
IMPORTANT: Anyone can sign up for eMusic and get 25 free downloads. If a customer downloads your music as one or more of these 25 free downloads, you will not get any payment for them--it's considered promotional. This is an eMusic policy. If you do not like the idea of people downloading your music for free, please do not choose eMusic as one of your digital distribution stores (send an email specifying this to info@dealwithmusic.com)
Once an eMusic customer signs up and passes the free trial period, they have one month to download any 30, 50 or 75 songs they want. At the end of the month, any songs not downloaded expire. For Example, if, by the last day of their month, an eMusic Basic customer downloaded only 23 of their 30 pre-bought songs, the eight "leftovers" expire and the customer has to buy another 30 (or more) songs in order to download more music.
For a complete description of the eMusic service, we suggest you read the eMusic FAQ.
IMPORTANT: eMusic now distributes in the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe, but may add more countries at any time. For the moment, you MUST have worldwide rights to your music before you select to have it available in eMusic. In the near future, Deal With Music will offer you the ability to control what parts of the world you make your music available in.
What do I get paid when songs or albums sell from eMusic?
eMusic works on a Subscription Pay Rate Permanent Download model, so the Pay Rate varies depending on how much money eMusic made in pre-sales each pay period. eMusic calculates how many songs were downloaded and how much money was made in the same three month period. This rate changes from month to month based on how many songs are downloaded and if customers that pre-paid for their songs downloaded everything they pre-bought.
To get the per-song Pay Rate, eMusic divides the amount of money made by the number of songs downloaded. This sets the Pay Rate for each song downloaded. From this Pay Rate, eMusic then deducts out Allowed Expenses (these are not negotiable and are the same Allowed Expenses deducted from all other labels and artists working with eMusic). Of what remains, you get 60%, and that sum is delivered to you by Deal With Music. As always, Deal With Music takes nothing, passing all of your money on to you.
For Example: Say, in the months of January, February, March there were a total of 1,000,000 songs downloaded from eMusic by all customers downloading all songs. Imagine in those same months eMusic took in $750,000 in digital download pre-pay revenue. That makes each individual download worth $0.75.
From this $0.75, eMusic then deducts expenses (credit card processing fees, bandwidth, other expenses). For this example, let's say the expenses come to $0.10 per song. This is subtracted from the $0.75 per song, leaving $0.65.
From this remaining $0.65, 60% goes to you. So in this example, you would make $0.39 per song bought: $0.39 is the Subscription Permanent Download Pay Rate for this store in this period. If you had forty downloads from eMusic in this period, you'd make 40 x $0.39 = $15.60 (U.S.), and as always, Deal With Music takes nothing, 100% of that money goes to you.



What do I need to know about Accounting?

Deal With Music is in partnership with Royalty Share, www.royaltyshare.com a leader company focused on providing comprehensive royalty accounting services, managing the complexities inherent in digital distribution to record labels, music distributors and publishers.
This is going to enable Deal With Music to analyze statistics of all sales and report everyone from very small amounts.
We account every quarter (3 month) within 45 days from the end of the period accounted*.
*(There can be exceptions, in cases where Deal With music doesn’t receive the accounts from the online stores on time).



How do I collect the money my music earned?

Any amount lower than 50 GB Pounds, 60 Euro  or 100 US$ or 100 Euro will be brought to the next statement. If you have a report showing more than these amounts, you can be paid by cheque, bank transfer or paypal, whichever you prefer. Send an email to info@dealwithmusic.com to communicate your preference.



Why is there so little (or no) money in my account?

If no money has shown up in your report, there's a reason. Here's a checklist of common reasons:
•    None of your music or music videos sold in the previous period. Remember, you get from the stores/services you chose whatever your content earned for you (vai a how paid) only after the data and money arrives. For example, data and money generated from the sale of a song from an iTunes store arrives approximately 45 days after the end of the month in which that song sold. Check your Report to see what months your music actually sold in.
•    Your music or music video never sold at all.
•    You're in the wrong account. Some people create multiple accounts. If you have multiple accounts, please make sure you've checked them all.



Do I get paid when someone downloads or streams a sample of my song or music video?

No. A 30-second sample (also known as a "Clip") is automatically created and made available for songs or even music videos listed on the stores/services you chose. Samples do not earn a payment. Samples can be made out of any consecutive 30-second part of the song, entirely at the discretion of the stores/services. Most stores choose the second 30 seconds of a song or video (second 30 to second 59 out of the first minute) for the sample, but this rule is not universal. Customers can listen to as many 30-second samples as many times as they want without paying for it. Samples are a great way to encourage people to buy, so it's a good thing.
If your album/EP/single contains a song(s) that is near or under 30 seconds long, no sample will be generated. IMPORTANT: The stores or services are solely responsible for creating samples or not. At this time, Deal With Music has no say in how or if a sample is made.



How much does it cost and what about invoicing?

Basic Account £49 per year, per release.
Full Account £99 per year, per release.
Split Deal 30/70

We will take NO MONEY out of your sales, whatever the amount is, for the Basic and Full Account. In the Split Deal Account we will keep 30% of all your royalty sales.
For more detail on the accounts see the previous questions.
If you require an invoice send us an email to info@dealwithmusic.com requesting your invoice with Name and Address to be invoiced.